How to rotate a PDF file the easy way round

What is a PDF?

Before the question of how to rotate a PDF is explained, it is first necessary to understand what a PDF is.

The .PDF extension on a file indicates that it is a Portable Document File.

How To Geek is a popular website that teaches people how to get the most out of their software and the site explains that the PDF format was created by Adobe in the 1990s.

The purpose behind creating a PDF file is to allow it to be emailed and read in the same format it was created without the receiver needing to have the program it was created on.

In most cases PDF files are ‘read only’ files that are designed so that recipients cannot make changes to them.

Why would I need to know how to rotate a PDF?

In some instances images are inserted into PDF files, such as company logos or photographs of a product. If you are creating a user manual for a specific product you will want the images to appear right side up when a user opens the document to read it.

It is also useful to know how to rotate a PDF if you are using images captured with a mobile phone, as sometimes they show up in the wrong orientation when you insert them.

What tools do I need?

Users will need a powerful PDF editing software that will allow them to manipulate PDF files and place text and images exactly where they are needed with a few simple keystrokes and mouse clicks.

Using this software gives all the tools and information needed to rotate a PDF file. TechGeekers recommends Movavi to users who want a simple and innovative method for working with PDF files.

Here’s how it works!

First, you need to download the software and install it on your machine. Once that is done, open the document you wish to edit, and get ready to learn how to rotate a PDF file.

Once you have the document open, scroll to the page you wish to rotate. Now, simply right click on the page and a sub menu will pop up. In that menu you can select Rotate Left or Rotate Right, and the page will be turned 90 degrees in the direction you selected.

You can also select Rotate 180° to turn the page completely upside down. This is the simplest method to answer the question of how to rotate a PDF file.

The second method is completed by using the keyboard shortcuts that are built the program. This method is effective for rotating multiple pages at the same time.

If the pages are in consecutive order, you can hit the Shift key on a PC and the CMD key on a Mac and then clicking the first and last pages in the list you want to rotate.

If they aren’t consecutive pages, then you can press and hold the CTRL key and then click the individual pages you want to rotate.

Once you have the pages highlighted, a right click with the mouse will bring up the same menu as before and you can select which direction you want the pages to be rotated. If you want to know how to rotate a PDF, then this is the method you want to use.

Permanent Changes

There is another built-in option that allow pages to permanently rotate within a PDF. to access this option, select the Manage Pages mode within the software.

Use the methods listed above to rotate the pages to be ediedt, then click Save in the file menu. There you have it – simple instructions for how to rotate a PDF file.

 

Monty (630 Posts)

Monty Munford has more than 15 years' experience in mobile, digital media, web and journalism. He is the founder of Mob76, a company that helps tech companies raise money and exit. He speaks regularly at global media events with a focus on Africa, writes a weekly column for The Telegraph, is a regular contributor to The Economist, Wired, Mashable and speaks regularly on the BBC World Service.


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About Monty

Monty Munford has more than 15 years' experience in mobile, digital media, web and journalism. He is the founder of Mob76, a company that helps tech companies raise money and exit. He speaks regularly at global media events with a focus on Africa, writes a weekly column for The Telegraph, is a regular contributor to The Economist, Wired, Mashable and speaks regularly on the BBC World Service.