Free Gamer Kit from Google for UK kid coders

codeclubTechnology education organisations Code Club and Technology Will Save Us have been brought together to offer an amazing opportunity to 900 children around the UK.

Thanks to $100,000 from the Google RISE program, children in Code Clubs will be able to receive DIY Gamer Kit to build and program during their club sessions for free, which normally costs £60.

The kit allows kids to solder together 40 parts on a custom circuit board to build their own handheld games console. Once the build is complete the console, controlled by Arduino, can be programmed to create exciting games. Children in Code Clubs will be taught soldering, electronics, programming and design using resources that have been created especially for the project.

Code Clubs that are interested in receiving free DIY Gamer Kits and resources can click here to find out more.

Understandably, due to the feel-good nature of this project, there were no end of quotes from those involved.

“Google has a critical role to play in making computer science more accessible and inclusive globally, especially for girls. This education is key, not just for developing tech sector talent, but for creating technology that makes a difference,” said Hai Hong, the K-12 Outreach Program Manager at Google.

“We are thrilled to be working with Code Club and it is exciting that Google is enabling these kinds of partnerships. This collaboration draws on the strengths of both organisations and allows us to enable thousands of young people and hundred of volunteers to become digital makers,” said Technology Will Save Us’ CEO Bethany Koby.

“We’ve had fantastic success teaching children to code in our clubs since 2012, and we’re excited to give them the opportunity to learn physical computing too. Programming devices to interact with their surroundings is an engaging, hands-on way to learn coding,” said Code Club’s Head of Education, Rik Cross.

Monty (624 Posts)

Monty Munford has more than 15 years' experience in mobile, digital media, web and journalism. He is the founder of Mob76, a company that helps tech companies raise money and exit. He speaks regularly at global media events with a focus on Africa, writes a weekly column for The Telegraph, is a regular contributor to The Economist, Wired, Mashable and speaks regularly on the BBC World Service.