Welcome to Penelope… a digital receptionist for SMEs

moneypenny_penelopeMoneypenny, apparently the UK’s largest answerphone service, has launched Penelope, a digital receptionist for SMEs.

Penelope is an app that lets small business owners control where and when their business calls ring 24/7. The app uses voice recognition technology (via Nuance and Aurix) and is supported by real people, otherwise known as HaaS (Humans as a Service).

Rather like emails, which can be dealt with immediately and on whatever device, calls can be put through to either a mobile, office phone, home phone or to a colleague. Other features include Moneypenny PA, a ‘real’ person who can take calls.

“There are more than 3.6 million micro businesses in the UK who are struggling to stay in control of their calls, but feel that they cannot afford a good quality receptionist. Penelope meets this need, with an app that provides support when and where they need it the most,” saidEd Reeves, Co-Founder of Moneypenny and Penelope.

A service that the market needs perhaps, also nice to know that the somewhat hackeneyed image of a PA is one personified by brand names such as Moneypenny and Penelope. Coming soon, a CEO called James Bond and a company driver called Parker.

Monty (638 Posts)

Monty Munford has more than 15 years' experience in mobile, digital media, web and journalism. He is the founder of Mob76, a company that helps tech companies raise money and exit. He speaks regularly at global media events with a focus on Africa, writes a weekly column for The Telegraph, is a regular contributor to The Economist, Wired, Mashable and speaks regularly on the BBC World Service.


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About Monty

Monty Munford has more than 15 years' experience in mobile, digital media, web and journalism. He is the founder of Mob76, a company that helps tech companies raise money and exit. He speaks regularly at global media events with a focus on Africa, writes a weekly column for The Telegraph, is a regular contributor to The Economist, Wired, Mashable and speaks regularly on the BBC World Service.