REVIEW: PaMu TWS wireless earphones

The PaMu TWS is a really good addition to the range of excellent wireless earphones.

PaMu

The PaMu TWS wireless earphones are a product of crowdfunding and while that platform can sometimes be overhyped and insubstantial, it regularly turns out useful products. In this case, an excellent one.

When reviewing such products, I usually road test them myself, then ask my teenage son to do the same and he usually comes up with the better ideas and suggestions.

I’m not generally a fan of devices that keep music quiet and personal in people’s ears. I hated Sony Walkmans when they first came out and I have never really changed since that time. I like music to be shared, I like to hear it loud and I like it flawed and analogue.

My teenage son, however, is literally wired differently, his head is continually in his ears listening to music and he loved the PaMu TWS, not least because of the sound quality, but the cuteness of charging them.

There’s no need to think outside the box, the earphones are charged within the box and he won’t allow me to take repossession of them, which is its own positive story.

The company’s claim that these earphones never fall out are also credible, I tried everything I could to get rid of them, but they stayed in place. They’re also water-resistant and it’s good to use a product that seems to be made for the long-term, not just a short-term throwaway piece of gimcrack.

Available in black or white and currently retailing at $79 (£59) at a discount from the future price of $100, these earphones are an excellent option for a birthday or Christmas present.

It’s only June, but maybe it’s time to put in a Christmas order to the teenagers in your life, they’ll thank you for it, take my (and my son’s) word for it.

Where you can ACTUALLY use bitcoin to buy stuff

Bitcoin is a currency, bitcoin is a commodity, bitcoin is a sham, bitcoin is the future, bitcoin is a conspiracy theory. Bitcoin should be upper-case, bitcoin should be lower-case.

bitcoin

Bitcoin isn’t as good as Ethereum, bitcoin cash is a better bet than bitcoin. Bitcoin was just lucky, blockchain is the important thing. Bitcoin is the blockchain, blockchain is lower-case for non-bitcoin. I could go on and on and on and on…

All of the above may be true, but where can you actually spend it if you have some? This comprehensive infographic from the clever image wizards at 16Best and I quote…

“Everybody will remember 2017 as the year when cryptocurrencies skyrocketed in value, especially bitcoin. While bitcoin had been slowly rising since its creation, 2017 was the year when its value went from around $1.000 to almost $20.000, making some of the naysayers rethink their stance on cryptocurrencies.

“Even though cryptocurrencies faced a lot of backlash in their early years, today almost everyone is on the bitcoin bandwagon. Of course, some countries are still resisting, but the vast majority have embraced it. In a relatively short time, bitcoin went from being an obscure currency on the internet to a payment method of the future used by big-name brands in hundreds of countries.

“Now companies such Shopify, Subway and Tesla have fully accepted bitcoin payments, and you can pay for any of their products or services with them.

However, even if a company doesn’t support bitcoin, there are some creative ways to buy their best products with it. For example, Gyft.com will help you buy Nike shoes with Bitcoin, while Expedia has embraced this cryptocurrency altogether.

“If you are interested in learning what other companies are accepting Bitcoin, then this infographic is tailor-made for you. Just scroll down and prepare to be amazed at how many of them are there.”

FIVE SUMMER GIFTS #6 – Cybersecurity device Fingbox

Cybersecurity in the home is as weak as a cokehead’s nostril, but the Fingbox is an excellent device that protects the domestic environment from web prowlers, snoopers and black hats.

finbox

There’s a 1960s pulp Sci-Fi film that terrified me as a kid; my trauma must have been so complete that I can’t (or won’t) remember its name. The terror it engendered was because of a TV that monitored people’s homes, even in the bedroom.

It was like a rubbish 1984, but it was still horrifying, the only good news being that it was impossible to happen in my lifetime. Ha! Thank God I didn’t know at the time that n 2018 everybody with a decent broadband connection has opened their doors, TVs or devices to anybody who wants to watch.

The ignorance and fragility of IoT devices, especially those in the home, are staggering. Easy-to-read passwords, an internet this is rarely switched off and bad people looking for a way in have it easy.

So step forward the Fingbox, a physical device that works with a downloadable app that warns of any external infringements and works somewhat better than a tripwire and a can in the back garden.

The Fingbox is not cheap, but what price piece of mind? Retailing at £125 from THAT website that also constantly monitors you, it connects to the home router and offers a range of services to protect the home.

Technical Specifications

* Monitoring of all wired and wireless devices on a network
* Two-year warranty
* No subscription fees
* 1 GB/s Ethernet port
* ARM 7 processor
* 4GB home board storage

For somebody like me, and you too I would suspect, it takes time to set up the Fingbox and to connect it with the app, but for those who know their tech (not least the bullet-points above) it should be easy.

When I had finally got it working, I really felt safer and, more worryingly, it has already flagged up attempts to tap into my home network. Those people REALLY are watching, it’s not Sci-Fi, it’s here and cannot be ignored.

Take your home security seriously. There are other products out there that offer the same type of protection, but I would look at the Fingbox first, it could be your friend in the future.

Everything you ever needed to know about blockchain

Picking your way through technology is harder than remembering the acronyms that govern our lives.

As the word ‘blockchain’ moves out of its humble bitcoin beginnings, many profess to know what it means while secretly munching their eyelashes at not getting it.

However, have no fear, the creative people at BitFortune.net have kindly supplied you with the following infographic that should still your beating blockchain heart.

Future conferences, dinner parties or even conversations with builders in dodgy pubs are no longer congregations of fear. Instead, you can dazzle, learn, share and you might even copulate.

Please see below…

FIVE SUMMER GIFTS #5 – Achilles Chef’s Knife

A Kickstarter campaign wants to deliver Michelin quality to the domestic cook with a design-led kitchen knife that cuts to the chase.

achilles

 

 

The Achilles knife is the most beautiful thing I have in my kitchen at the moment and while I’m not even a half-decent cook, men like me always enjoy having the equipment.

Twenty-five years ago when I was on the dole, I bought a bread knife for £20 and it still sits proudly in my drawer, so far living up to its life-time guarantee. So, I like kitchen knives and what they represent.

The Achillles Chef’s Knife will cost considerably more than £20 when its Kickstarter campaign comes to an end, $249 (£174) to be precise. For early birds though who wish to pre-order can now get one for $100 (£68).

The campaign is already wildly over-subscribed so there is already a market for such a high-end product. However, does it cut through the hype?

The answer is a resounding yes and that’s because it is design-led. It comes in a box-for-life that begs to be displayed on the kitchen island and is ergonomically spruce.

The hole in the knife may seem like a gimmick, but it adds to the aesthetics and fits the high-end emotions experienced when using it. It also does what every other knife does; it cuts things.

The knife has also been recognised by those who bestow awards. Earlier this year, the Achilles Knife won the German Design Award for 2018 for “Excellent Product Design – Kitchen“. It’s well-deserved.

It remains moot whether a lot of people will pay nearly $250 for a knife, but like anything that is expensive, cost-per-use is vital. It may seem like a lot of money, but if it’s used every day and retains its looks over the years, then it’s a bargain.

I don’t know how much £20 was worth when I bought my bread knife in the early 1990s, but I do know it was one of best purchases of my life.

I have the feeling the Achilles Chef’s Knife possesses the same qualities. Over to you.