150 WORD REVIEW: Made With by John Grant

Made With book coverWhat Grant defines as the ‘Interland’ is one of the most fascinating, fastest growing regions in the world. Ranging from Turkey to North Africa and covering everywhere from the MIddle East right through to Indonesia, the Interland is a place where traditional thinking says that ‘East and West collide’. In reality, these are incredibly youthful societies going through some huge changes – socially and economically.

While most books and reports about this region are dominated by religion, conflict and general unpleasantness, ‘Made With’  focuses on creativity, brands and entrepreneurship. The result is a book that is an interesting primer, though perhaps one that perhaps would have benefitted from a tighter focus, more case studies and more interviews and interviewees. The sections featuring these are the ones that really shine, and it’s a shame there aren’t more of them. With that said, ‘Made With‘ is still well worth a look.

150-WORD BOOK REVIEW: Computerised You by Shane Richmond

Kindle- Computerised You.inddAs the ex-editor of the Technology section of the Telegraph and one of the few journalists to have interviewed Apple’s Jonny Ive, Richmond has produced a little gem on ‘wearables’, the technology that we will all eventually use.

Citing watches, Google Glass and even future subcutaneous wearables, Computerised You has interviews with global influencers and mavens and is a quick read, not least because it’s so well-written. The content therein may alarm some readers as Richmond appears to have no problem with the forthcoming merger of man and machine, but in many respects this book be used as a reference for the future.

It may be more than 25 years before the Singularity is upon us, but it’s probably best to prepare for it now (especially if you have children). This book is a very useful asset in doing exactly that.

The book is available for £1.49 on Kindle and Amazon… Richmond blogs about technology here.

REVIEW: 8.25/10

150-WORD REVIEW: To Save Everything, Click Here by Evgeny Morosov

To Save EverythingI am occasionally guilty of being slack jawed when it comes to technological advancement. We’re constantly presented with Ted Talks, books and articles which lionise the tech industry as being the source of solutions for everything from healthcare to education and politics to death.

For every ying of utopian thinking, there needs to be a yang of realism and occasional cynicism. That is what Evgeny Morosov presents in his latest book. He dissects topics ranging from social media’s role in the Arab Spring to the quantified self movement – criticisng what he sees as “techno-solutionism” and “cyber-utopianism”.

You might not agree any of much of what he says (many won’t agree with any of it), but you owe it to yourself to at least read some of the counter-arguments that are out there. Read it. I guarantee it will give you pause for thought.

UK commuters now take £4,100 of technology to work

T£4,100 deviceshe UK public’s demand for gadgets show no sign of abating after a recent report shows that the ‘typical commuter bag’ now contains as many as six gadgets with their contingent chargers.

According to research from ensure home insurance, people now take £4,100 worth of technology to work every day, a £289 increase compared to two years ago. Continue reading

America’s joint love affair with cannabis and digital technology

This contribution is by Mike Johns, President of Digital Mind State

Like Cavalier Poet Robert Herrick’s ode to the illicit, Farewell to Sack, America has a deep-seated love for our favourite forbidden fruit: cannabis.

This love affair between our creativity and psychic elevation continues to play out before our eyes in popular culture. Continue reading